DCH News

Mokhashi joins Driscoll as pediatric endocrinologist

March 04, 2013
Mokhashi
Mokhashi
CORPUS CHRISTI - Moinuddin H. Mokhashi, MD, FAAP, has joined Children's Physician Services of South Texas at Driscoll Children's Hospital as a pediatric endocrinologist. Dr. Mokhashi was previously with Specialty Pediatrics Ltd. in Yuma, Ariz. and the State of Arizona's Children's Rehabilitative Services. He completed his residency in pediatrics at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - New Orleans in 2005 and a fellowship in pediatric endocrinology/diabetes at Children's Hospital in New Orleans in 2003. Dr. Mokhashi earned his medical degree in 1999 at Bangalore University in India. He is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics.

Radiothon will broadcast tomorrow from Driscoll Children's Hospital

February 28, 2013
CORPUS CHRISTI - On Friday, March 1, K-99 (KRYS 99.1 FM) will team up with Driscoll Children's Hospital and McDonald's for the 11th annual Radiothon. The one-day event will be broadcasted live from the Half Pint Library in the main lobby at Driscoll Children's Hospital beginning at 6 a.m.

Listeners can tune in to hear patients, parents, physicians and staff share inspirational stories of hope and healing. Over the past decade, K-99 listeners have helped raise more than $450,000 to benefit the patients and services provided at Driscoll Children's Hospital.

For more information or to donate, contact Driscoll's Development Department at (361) 694-6401.

What: 11th annual Radiothon
When: 6 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, March 1
Where: Driscoll Children's Hospital main lobby, 3533 S. Alameda St.

Sutton joins Driscoll as pediatric pathologist

February 25, 2013
Sutton
Sutton
CORPUS CHRISTI - Lisa M. Sutton, MD has joined Driscoll Children's Hospital as a pediatric pathologist. Dr. Sutton completed a fellowship in pediatric pathology at Children's Medical Center in Dallas and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. She performed her residency at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, where she also earned her medical degree. Dr. Sutton is certified in anatomic and clinical pathology by the American Board of Pathology.

Driscoll Children's Quick Care - McAllen has much to celebrate

February 22, 2013
On Feb. 7, staff at Driscoll Children's Quick Care - McAllen celebrated the clinic's four-year anniversary and December's record number of patients. Pictured, left to right, are (front row): Carla Amezquita, Lori Ayala, Juan Calderon, Rebecca Garza, Yadira Ruiz, Dora Renteria, Martin Madera, Juan Mendiola, Yanira Valdez, Jessica Valenzuela and Anna Cavazos; back row: Martin Villarreal, Joe Vasquez, Greg Torres, Brittany Lopez, Gail Weigel and Yesenia Carter.
On Feb. 7, staff at Driscoll Children's Quick Care - McAllen celebrated the clinic's four-year anniversary and December's record number of patients. Pictured, left to right, are (front row): Carla Amezquita, Lori Ayala, Juan Calderon, Rebecca Garza, Yadira Ruiz, Dora Renteria, Martin Madera, Juan Mendiola, Yanira Valdez, Jessica Valenzuela and Anna Cavazos; back row: Martin Villarreal, Joe Vasquez, Greg Torres, Brittany Lopez, Gail Weigel and Yesenia Carter.
Clinic opened four years ago, recently saw record number of patients

McALLEN - Staff at Driscoll Children's Quick Care - McAllen recently celebrated the clinic's four-year anniversary and a record number of patients seen in the month of December. The 2,900-square-foot clinic, located in Driscoll Children's Medical Plaza, opened on Feb. 23, 2009 and offers outpatient, non-emergency medical care for patients from birth to 21 years old.

Rio Grande Valley families appreciate Quick Care's hours of operation - 6 to 11 p.m. on weekdays and 2 to 11 p.m. on weekends - because they fill the gap when their children's primary physicians' offices are closed. Quick Care's physicians typically see about 9,500 patients per year, averaging about 790 per month. In December 2012, a record 1,114 patients were seen.

Laura Cortez, executive director of Driscoll's Rio Grande Valley clinics, attributes Quick Care's success to a local staff and Driscoll's legacy of excellent pediatric medical care.

"We're proud to say that our staff and physicians are from the Rio Grande Valley and they understand the needs of the community," she said. "We care for children with all the experience that Driscoll Children's Hospital has to offer."

Non-life-threatening illnesses like coughs, colds, asthma and allergies can be treated at Driscoll Children's Quick Care - McAllen, as well as minor lacerations, fractures and sprains. Laboratory services, X-rays, ultrasounds and computed tomography scans are also performed at the Medical Plaza.

Driscoll Children's Quick Care - McAllen is located at 1120 E. Ridge Rd. and can be reached at 800-525-8687 (toll free) or (956) 688-1350.

Three Driscoll physicians included on Top Doctors list

February 21, 2013
Samhar Al-Akash, MD, Stephen Almond, MD and Jaime Fergie, MD
Samhar Al-Akash, MD, Stephen Almond, MD and Jaime Fergie, MD
CORPUS CHRISTI - Three Driscoll Children's Hospital physicians have been included on U.S. News & World Report's list of Top Doctors. Samhar Al-Akash, MD, Stephen Almond, MD and Jaime Fergie, MD were nominated by fellow physicians to be on the list (http://health.usnews.com/top-doctors), which is designed to be a reliable resource for patients and referring physicians.

"First, we want to help consumers find the doctors who can best address their needs," the U.S. News website states. "Second, we want to enlist doctors across the country in sharing their awareness of who among their peers are the most worthy of referral."

Physicians on the Top Doctors list are identified by name, location, hospital affiliation and specialty. Specialties span more than 2,000 diseases, medical issues and procedures.

"I think inclusion on the list is a big positive for Driscoll Children's Hospital as well as myself," said Dr. Almond, a pediatric surgeon who, with Dr. Al-Akash and others, helped launch Driscoll's Kidney Transplant Program in 2007. More than 60 kidney transplants have since been performed at Driscoll.

"It's a reflection of the hospital's administration and governing board because they had the foresight to start the transplant program."

U.S. News determines which physicians qualify as Top Doctors in collaboration with New York City-based Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. Physicians are chosen based on nominations from other doctors and reviews by Castle Connolly's physician-led research team. Any physician may nominate one or more peers, but doctors can't nominate themselves. Physicians can't pay U.S. News or Castle Connolly to be selected as Top Doctors. Hospitals or group practices also can't pay to have their doctors selected.

"It's an honor to be included on this list," said Dr. Fergie, Driscoll's director of Infectious Diseases. "I'm grateful to my colleagues who nominated me and to all those who have supported the research program in Infectious Diseases at Driscoll Children's Hospital. This encourages me to continue serving the children of South Texas."

Nurses and doctors have forever changed our lives

February 20, 2013
Jailynn was born with a life-threatening heart condition known as pulmonary stenosis. Hours after her birth, she was flown to Driscoll Children's Hospital, where she had her first open-heart surgery at 4 days old. We met the most wonderful nurses and doctors who have forever changed our lives by saving our little miracle! Jailynn has had a total of three open heart surgeries at Driscoll and several heart catheterizations, including a melody valve placement, a fairly new procedure that has helped save her life! We are forever grateful!

Submitted by: Denisse and Juan, Edinburg, TX

I am a survivor of cancer. It can be beat.

February 20, 2013
My name is Katie. I am 29 years old and have been in remission since I was 9. I was diagnosed when I was 7 years old and went through two years of chemotherapy and treatment. I was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which if I remember correctly, was the most treatable. We lived about an hour and a half away from Driscoll but I remember the drives to the hospital for the overnight stays for chemotherapy. I absolutely loved my activity director who made the stays so much easier. I got to be on the news and meet Joe Gazin, which was a highlight for me at that age! I don't know really know what else to say except hope and pray. I am a mother now of a 4-year-old beautiful little girl. I am a survivor of cancer. It can be beat.

Submitted by: Katie, Tyler, TX

Thanks to those angels who took care of my miracle baby

February 20, 2013
Adam was a 24-week baby who had to be born on December 30, 2007, with a weight of 1 pound and 14 ounces; his due date was April 11, 2008. He was admitted to Driscoll four days after he was born due to a surgery he needed in his heart, a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure, but he also had a brain hemorrhage level four. There was a good chance that he wasn't going to be able to walk, talk or eat by himself. It was also a possibility that he was going to be blind and have cerebral palsy.

After seven surgeries, and to this day, he walks and eats by himself and he is not blind. He does have a developmental delay, but he has achieved a lot since his discharge from Driscoll in May 2008. Thanks to all those angels who took care of my baby. He is now 5 years old and he is very smart. He is my miracle baby, and Driscoll Children's Hospital is an expert in caring for all their little miracles.

Submitted by: Teresa, Brownsville, TX

Driscoll celebrates its 60th anniversary with a party for patients

February 20, 2013
CORPUS CHRISTI - The first of several events planned to commemorate Driscoll Children's Hospital's 60th anniversary will be held tomorrow, and the invitees are the most important people in the Driscoll family: our patients.

"We thought, what better way to celebrate Driscoll's anniversary than to throw a party for our patients?," said Karen Long, Driscoll vice president of Patient Care Services and Chief Patient Care Officer. "The children of South Texas are the reason Driscoll Children's Hospital was created 60 years ago and they're the reason we're here today. They deserve to have some fun."

Tomorrow's event will have the feel of a giant birthday party, with children enjoying music, games, a magic show and face painting. A photo booth will be available for keepsake photos and patients will be able to make their own party hats. Birthday-themed treats will be offered to party-goers, including a cake.

Driscoll Children's Hospital was dedicated on February 22, 1953 and had 25 beds. It's now a 189-bed facility that serves patients from 31 counties and 33,000 square miles of South Texas. Throughout 2013, Driscoll's website will feature special patient stories, videos of anniversary wishes and the hospital's historical timeline. The web address is www.driscollchildrens.org.

What: Driscoll Children's Hospital's 60th anniversary party for patients
When: 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21
Where: Driscoll Children's Hospital auditorium, 3533 S. Alameda St.

Looking back: The little girl who battled H1N1 and prevailed

February 15, 2013
Kayla Piñon (center) reflected on her life-threatening battle with the H1N1 flu recently with her parents, Luis and Melinda Piñon.
Kayla Piñon (center) reflected on her life-threatening battle with the H1N1 flu recently with her parents, Luis and Melinda Piñon.
Driscoll Children's Hospital celebrates its 60th anniversary with a series of stories about extraordinary patients

CORPUS CHRISTI - The number of South Texas families whose lives have been touched by Driscoll Children's Hospital since it opened its doors in 1953 is incalculable. And of the countless children who've come to the hospital in the past 60 years, many stand out for their particularly memorable stories. Driscoll is sharing some of those stories of hope and healing throughout 2013 as part of its 60th anniversary celebration.

Kayla Piñon became a member of the Driscoll family in 2009 when, at 10 years old, she battled her way back from a life-threatening case of the H1N1 flu. More than 1,000 children died from H1N1 during the 2009 pandemic, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Popularly known as swine flu, H1N1 was particularly harmful to the young, who had little natural resistance to a virus that hadn't circulated in decades. Hundreds of people became ill with the virus in Nueces County and at least 11 people died from it between 2009 and 2010.

When she was admitted to Driscoll Children's Hospital, Kayla was dehydrated, underweight and gasping for air due to excessive fluid in her lungs.

"I just remember going into the hospital, then tubes being taken out of me seven days later," she said recently at her home.

Driscoll physicians said Kayla's was the severest case of the H1N1 flu they had ever seen. To make matters worse, she was also suffering from a staph infection called MRSA. It took a diverse team of experts and modern medical technology to save the girl's life. The tubes she recalled being taken out of her came from an Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) machine, a mechanized pump that circulates the patient's blood and provides oxygen to the body when the body can't do it alone. It works like an artificial lung for patients who can't be supported with a ventilator, as was the case with Kayla.

"This case exemplifies the great teamwork that exists here at Driscoll Children's Hospital," said Karl Serrao, MD, a pediatric intensivist who helped treat Kayla. "To make this miracle happen, everyone including nurses, doctors, respiratory therapists and many others worked together. Our community and our children benefit daily from Driscoll's investment in the ECMO machine and other innovative technologies and therapies."

Watching their daughter struggle to breathe, unconscious, was a day-to-day, nail-biting experience for her parents. When Kayla regained her health, her father, Luis Piñon, said it was a miracle. He also credited Driscoll's staff for being a source of comfort throughout the ordeal.

"The people there go above and beyond," he said. "From the chaplains, doctors and nurses to the housekeepers - they all treat you with respect, like you're part of the family. They don't give up hope."

Kayla gained local notoriety after her recovery. She and her parents gracefully gave interviews to newspaper and TV reporters who were eager to tell the story of the little girl who beat the odds. To this day, people who read about Kayla or saw her on TV ask about her, said her mother, Melinda Piñon.

Now a cheerful 8th grader who participates in tumbling at school, Kayla has a slight cough due to a small amount of fluid in her lungs - remnants of the H1N1 flu, explained her mother. She sees a Driscoll pulmonologist every three months for a check-up and breathing tests. All indications are that "she's doing good," Melinda Piñon said.

Luis Piñon has a new appreciation for the emotional challenges parents face when their child is hospitalized with a serious illness.

"Nobody really knows what that situation will be like until you're in those four walls," he said. "At times I had doubts about Kayla's outcome. But she's a survivor."

For the Driscoll team who treated Kayla, her case stands out as a moment of pride.

"It was an inspiration not only to see the family persevere and Kayla win, but also to see the staff at Driscoll step up to the plate during that challenging time of the H1N1 influenza outbreak," Dr. Serrao said.

The Piñons, who live in Corpus Christi, said they're grateful to have Driscoll Children's Hospital in their hometown. They've also taken their kids to Driscoll Children's Urgent Care clinic when they were sick.

"When people ask me about their children's illnesses, I tell them to take them to Driscoll," Melinda Piñon said.

Luis Piñon remembers driving past Driscoll Children's Hospital as a child. He said he hopes the hospital is around for another 60 years.

"We're blessed to have a hospital like Driscoll in Corpus Christi. For me, it's second to none. That's from the heart."

Driscoll staff will probably see Kayla in the future as a volunteer in the Summer Volunteen Program, her mother said. She loves to take care of children, particularly the young cousins she babysits.

"Children kind of gravitate to her," Melinda Piñon said.

Always optimistic, Kayla said her experience at Driscoll Children's Hospital helped her choose a career field.

"It would be a dream come true to be a nurse. I would like to help kids when they're sick. I already know about respiratory therapy and the machines that are used."