DCH News

Resident Testimonials

Driscoll resident receives grant to attend medical conference

November 12, 2013
Ezekiel
Ezekiel
CORPUS CHRISTI - Anitha Ezekiel, MD, resident physician at Driscoll Children's Hospital, was chosen by the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) to receive an $800 travel support grant and complimentary registration to attend the program for medical students and residents at ASN Kidney Week 2013, held Nov. 5-10 in Atlanta. More than 13,000 kidney professionals attended the event, described by ASN as the world's premier nephrology meeting. Kidney Week provides participants with opportunities to exchange knowledge, learn the latest scientific and medical advances and engage in discussions with leading experts in the field.

Driscoll resident receives Maternal and Child Health Scholarship

October 22, 2013
Adepoju
Adepoju
CORPUS CHRISTI - Oluwarotimi "Timi" Adepoju, MD, a second-year resident physician at Driscoll Children's Hospital, is one of 23 residents chosen to receive the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2013 Maternal and Child Health Scholarship. The $500 scholarship enables Dr. Adepoju to attend the AAP's National Conference and Exhibition Oct. 26-29, 2013, in Orlando, where he will attend medical education sessions on maternal and child health issues.

Driscoll resident leads book drive for young clinic patients

May 13, 2013
At the book delivery to Amistad Community Health Center May 1 were (from left): Driscoll resident Shuya Wu, MD, PhD; Diana Chavez, Amistad receptionist; Victoria Vidaurre, certified medical assistant (CMA) at Amistad; Julie Flores, CMA at Amistad; Joe Flores, Amistad chief financial officer; Stacy Samples, CMA at Amistad; Stephanie Kanapaux, Amistad receptionist; Jamie Flores, CMA at Amistad; Rose Garcia, Amistad receptionist; Lori Anderson, MD, Amistad pediatrician; and Driscoll resident Shaye Walston, DO.
At the book delivery to Amistad Community Health Center May 1 were (from left): Driscoll resident Shuya Wu, MD, PhD; Diana Chavez, Amistad receptionist; Victoria Vidaurre, certified medical assistant (CMA) at Amistad; Julie Flores, CMA at Amistad; Joe Flores, Amistad chief financial officer; Stacy Samples, CMA at Amistad; Stephanie Kanapaux, Amistad receptionist; Jamie Flores, CMA at Amistad; Rose Garcia, Amistad receptionist; Lori Anderson, MD, Amistad pediatrician; and Driscoll resident Shaye Walston, DO.
Giving back 'is part of being a member of a community,' she said

CORPUS CHRISTI - In an effort to promote early childhood literacy, Driscoll Children's Hospital senior resident Shaye Walston, DO, recently spearheaded a project to collect children's books for patients at Amistad Community Health Center. Donations skyrocketed, and on May 1, 850 books were delivered to the clinic. They're being given to patients when they arrive for well-child checkups.

"Every book will make a big difference to the child who receives it," Dr. Walston said. "By my calculations, these should last Amistad nearly a year."

The new and gently used books were donated by Driscoll's resident physicians and members of the community, Dr. Walston said. They're suitable for kids 0-18 years old.

"We were very surprised and grateful when Dr. Walston arrived in her car loaded with boxes," said Amistad physician Lori Anderson, MD. "The kids here love to pick out a book to take home after their appointments. All of the books will be enjoyed."

The book drive is part of an advocacy campaign titled "Read, Lead, Succeed" that is sponsored by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on Medical Students, Residents, and Fellowship Trainees (SOMSRFT). Dr. Walston is the outgoing AAP delegate for Driscoll's residency program.

According to the AAP website, "When researching for projects, SOMSRFT executive committee
members learned that one-third of 4th graders read so poorly they cannot complete their schoolwork
successfully and children who are read to regularly are 3-4 times less likely to drop out of school. Statistics like this coupled with recent budget cuts to important programs stood out to the group and inspired everyone to try and make changes."

Dr. Walston, who plans to remain in Corpus Christi and practice as a general pediatrician after graduating from Driscoll's residency program next month, hopes to help future Driscoll residents give back to the community through annual donation drives.

"I think giving back is part of being a member of a community," she said. "Growing up, my parents encouraged us to educate ourselves, and reading was one of the best ways to pass time. To be able to give children a chance to further themselves and find a book to lose themselves in is just a small way to open doors for their future."

Dr. Walston has entered the book drive in a contest among residency programs for their advocacy projects sponsored by the Boston-based organization Reach Out & Read. Projects are graded on a variety of factors and the winning residency program, to be chosen this summer, will receive hundreds of books for the clinic of their choice, she said.


In pursuit of excellence, Driscoll residents far outpace total pass rate for American Board of Pediatrics certification

December 20, 2012
CORPUS CHRISTI - Driscoll Children's Hospital is proud to announce that all of its graduating residents who took the latest American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) certification exam in general pediatrics passed on their first attempt, continuing a trend that surpasses the total annual pass rate. Certification through the exam, administered once a year in October, has one objective - to promote excellence in medical care for children and adolescents.

"ABP certification provides a standard of excellence by which the public can select pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists," according to the ABP. "Although certification is voluntary, nearly all qualified pediatricians seek this recognition."

The ABP certification pass rate for pediatric residents at Driscoll Children's Hospital for the past three years has been 98 percent, ranking them in the top 5 percent of the more than 200 pediatric residency programs in the country, said William Dirksen, MD, Driscoll chief of staff. In contrast, the total pass rate for candidates taking the ABP general pediatrics exam in 2009, 2010 and 2011 was 79.1 percent, 76.1 percent and 75.7 percent, respectively, according to the ABP.

The ABP certification exam is a one-day test given to physicians who have finished three years of pediatric residency training. Physicians must have a valid, unrestricted, permanent medical license to be eligible to sit for the test. Certification is valid for seven years after which physicians must recertify by taking the ABP's Program for Maintenance of Certification in Pediatrics recertification exam.

Here are some additional facts from the ABP:

The ABP has certified 77,328 diplomates in general pediatrics and 14,707 in pediatric subspecialties.

Among the pediatricians who take the ABP test, 66 percent go into general pediatric practice and 24 percent go into pediatric subspecialties.

An average of 3,007 pediatricians take the ABP exam every year. Of these, American medical graduates accounted for 82.5 percent and international medical graduates accounted for 17.5 percent. Gender-wise, 40 percent were males and 60 percent were females.

The total number of pediatric residents currently in training programs in the United States is 9,731.

The average age at the time of ABP certification for pediatricians is 32 years for American medical graduates and about 36 years for international medical graduates.

The success of Driscoll's residency program can be attributed largely to the hospital's governing board, administration, faculty and staff, all of whom are dedicated to fostering excellent pediatricians.

"I have been blessed to have the necessary support to create an environment where aspiring physicians can be trained to become the best pediatricians in the world," Dr. Dirksen said. "Driscoll faculty has been outstanding in their commitment to the teaching and mentoring of our residents."

Research by Driscoll residents & physicians gains national, international recognition

June 22, 2012
CORPUS CHRISTI - An abstract written by Driscoll Children's Hospital resident Sanjeet Panda, MD and co-authored by Driscoll physicians Stephen Almond, MD, Mohammad Emran, MD, Haroon Patel, MD, Juan Prieto, MD and Leon Smith-Harrison, MD has been accepted for presentation at the 2012 American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans Oct. 20-23 and the XVII Ibero-American Society for Pediatric Urology Meeting Sept. 4-8 in Cartagena, Colombia. Research for Dr. Panda's abstract, titled "Surgical Management for the Palpable Undescended Testicle: Scrotal or Inguinal Approach?," was conducted at Driscoll Children's Hospital.

Dr. Panda, Driscoll resident Grace Lucas, MD and Dr. Prieto also collaborated on two abstracts, "Scrotal Approach for Definitive Management of Cryptorchidism and Communicating Hydrocele in Children" and "Effects of Urethroplasty Suturing Technique in Primary Tubularized Incised Plate (TIP) Hypospadias Repair," both of which have been accepted for presentation at the 91st annual meeting of the South Central Section- American Urological Association Oct. 24-27 in Colorado Springs, Colo., as well as the XVII Ibero-American Society for Pediatric Urology Meeting in Cartagena.

In addition, Driscoll resident Karen Tuano, MD was named the first place winner in the 2012 Texas Pediatric Society Fellow and Resident Poster Contest for her poster in the Evidence Based Medicine/Quality of Improvement category, titled "Preliminary Study on Control of Asthma in Children 6-11 Years Old Who Visit the Emergency Department at Driscoll Children's Hospital." Residents Monika Bhagat, MD, Mavie Narcise, MD and Shuya Wu, MD were contributors to the project. Also, resident Devasena Iyer, MD received second place for her poster in the same category, titled "WAT-1 vs. SOS: Determination of Iatrogenic Withdrawal in the ICU, a Pilot Study." Driscoll physician Kevin Schooler, MD, PhD served as Dr. Iyer's advisor.

Driscoll residents use grant to help families at women's shelter

April 30, 2012
Wu
Wu


Encalada
Encalada
CORPUS CHRISTI - This month, two second-year residents at Driscoll Children's Hospital used a grant from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) to vaccinate children, educate families about vaccination and research barriers to vaccination at the Women's Shelter of South Texas.

Shuya Wu, MD and Santiago Encalada, MD received a prestigious Community Access to Child Health (CATCH) grant for $3,000 from the AAP to implement the project.

"We noticed that children at the Women's Shelter oftentimes had not received required vaccinations, leaving them vulnerable to disease," Dr. Wu said.

Lori Anderson, MD, pediatrician at Amistad Community Health Center, served as the continuity clinic physician and mentor for the project, Dr. Wu said. Dr. Anderson also helped by providing supplies for the immunizations and obtaining vaccines from the state. Through their partnership with the Women's Shelter, doctors Wu and Encalada administered questionnaires to families to learn about the barriers they were experiencing in getting vaccinations for their children.

CATCH grants of up to $3,000 are awarded twice a year on a competitive basis to pediatric residents to address the needs of children in their communities. Applicants for the grants must include planning activities for their projects and in some cases implementation activities, according to the AAP.